| Home | Free Articles for Your Site | Submit an Article | Advertise | Link to Us | Search | Contact Us |
This site is an archive of old articles


vertical line

Cottage And Chalet Lodge Country Wintertime Snowmobiling Safety

The snow groomed trails of winter, great scenery and friendly people. Snowmobiler's paradise. But be more than careful and you, your snowmobile pack friends and family will have a safe and enjoyable event. Know the hazards of your snowmobiling district in order that you can have a safe and enjoyable ride.

- Keep your eyes on the trail ahead, and watch for the guy wires (Guy wires are the cables which anchor the poles to the ground). They usually have bright markers but these may well be buried in snow drifts.

- Remember that darkness, fog or snow can make these guy wires even harder to see and avoid at the last second. Listen to the weather forecast (Environment Canada) before starting out.

- Drive at a reasonable and safe speed at all times, but especially keep your speeds down near utility poles. If you do see a downed power line – then stay far far away from it and especially anything lying nearby or touching that downed electric power line. The fallen electric power line can simply be touching a fence, a tree or fallen into water on a warm day. Of course you should never ever drive over downed power lines under any circumstances.

- Always make it a point and overall policy to stay clear of substations and other hydro and electric power facilities.

- Downed electric power lines are a major danger and hazard. If you do see a downed power line – then stay far far away from it and especially anything lying nearby or touching that downed electric power line. The fallen electric power line can simply be touching a fence, a tree or fallen into water on a warm day. Of course you should never ever drive over downed power lines under any circumstances.

- If you do see someone who is in contact with a downed power line, do not under any circumstances touch them, other wise you will be electric shock victim number 2. It goes without stating that you will be adding fuel to the fire. You will in no position whatsoever to help them. Call for help. Do not try to move a downed electric power line. Even with a non-conductive material such as wood, for example a broom handle or tree limb, you could still be injured by the high voltage electric current. This is extremely dangerous. Do not risk it – no matter what heroic stories you have heard. Call for professional help. Again you will only become victim number two.

- Take into account both the terrain and your ability when determining how fast a speed is too fast.

- Stay on trails or in areas where snowmobiling is allowed - do not trespass or take unnecessary short cuts.

- Be familiar with areas that you travel through and try to avoid traveling over water.

- Keep your snowmobile properly maintained.

- Always wear a properly certified helmet with goggles or a visor and warm properly layered clothing.

- Ride with a friend, or in a group, and let someone know where you are going and what time you will be back.

- A portable global positioning system (G.P.S.) is a most useful and relatively inexpensive safety device acting as a mapping, navigation and safety backup device.

- If the area that you are snowmobiling in has cellular telephone coverage, then a cellular phone can function as a simple.

Safety warning or alerting device. In a pinch you can always call for help. That is as long as the phone is charged up. If you vehicle stalls you may not have the luxury of charging your cell phone via the cigarette lighter adapter of your snowmobile.

- Always know and use proper hand signals, especially in a group setting. Your riding comrades can see you well; they may not hear the sound of verbal commands over the sounds of the engines and the crackling snow and ice.

- Lastly always carry emergency supplies - and know first aid and winter survival skills.

Remember it’s cold and lonely out there.

Submitted by:

Kerry A. Francis

Manitoba Beaches and Yards Manitoba Golf Course Care Manitoba Forest Hunting Lodges




ARTICLE CATEGORIES

Aging
Arts and Crafts
Auto and Trucks
Automotive
Business
Business and Finance
Cancer Survival
Classifieds
Computers and Internet
Education
Family
Finances
Food and Drink
Gadgets and Gizmos
Gardening
Health
Hobbies
Home Improvement
Home Management
Humor
Jobs
Kids and Teens
Leadership
Legal
Legal B
Marketing
Men
Music and Movies
Online Business
Parenting
Pets and Animals
Politics and Government
Recreation and Sports
Relationships
Religion and Faith
Self Improvement
Site Promotion
Travel and Leisure
Travel Part B
Web Development
Women
Writing



http://www.articlesurfing.com/sports/cottage_and_chalet_lodge_country_wintertime_snowmobiling_safety.html
Copyright © 1995-2016 Photius Coutsoukis (All Rights Reserved).