| Home | Free Articles for Your Site | Submit an Article | Advertise | Link to Us | Search | Contact Us |
This site is an archive of old articles

    SEARCH ARTICLES
    Custom Search


vertical line

Article Surfing Archive



DBS And Parkinson's Disease - Articles Surfing

For the millions who suffer from Parkinson's disease or other movement disorders, a new procedure is offering much-needed relief from these painful and debilitating tremors, stiffness and muscle spasms. The procedure, called deep brain stimulation (DBS), is a surgery in which the doctor implants a small device that sends an electrical signal to a specific part of brain. Just as a heart pacemaker uses electricity to regulate an erratic heartbeat, deep brain stimulation uses electricity to pace the firing of neurons that control movement.

Movement disorders, like many other brain disease, happen when the brain's complex circuits malfunction. Before DBS, patients with Parkinson's disease, essential tremor, dystonia and other movement disorders had little choice but to rely on medication to control their symptoms, and in many cases the benefits would decline over time. Now, deep brain stimulation is offering greater relief from involuntary jerks, tremors, stiffness and gait disturbance, especially for patients whose symptoms no longer respond to medication.

Treating Parkinson's disease

Deep brain stimulation was first introduced nearly 15 years ago. In 1997, the U.S. Food and drug administration approved the procedure for use in controlling tremors, and in 2002 DBS was approved for treating Parkinson's disease, a disorder characterized by shaking, rigidity and slowness of movement that afflicts tens of millions of people around the world. During the procedure, a neurosurgeon inserts a tiny wire through an incision in the skull. The wire tip carrying an electrode is positioned in the area of the brain that controls movement. Then the surgeon maneuvers the other end of the wire to connect with the neurostimulator ' a battery pack about the size of a pocket watch that is usually implanted under the skin near the collarbone.

In the most cases, the surgery takes about 4 to 8 hours. Patients usually stay in the hospital for two nights and fully recover in 4to 6 weeks.

The neurostimulator is designed to remain in the body permanently, and patients undergo a minor surgery every three to five years to replace the batteries. Whenever necessary, doctors can make adjustments or even turn the neurostimulator off from outside the body.

Submitted by:

Eric Timmy

Read more article about Parkinson's Disease



        RELATED SITES






https://articlesurfing.org/medicines_and_remedies/dbs_and_parkinsons_disease.html

Copyright © 1995 - Photius Coutsoukis (All Rights Reserved).










ARTICLE CATEGORIES

Aging
Arts and Crafts
Auto and Trucks
Automotive
Business
Business and Finance
Cancer Survival
Career
Classifieds
Computers and Internet
Computers and Technology
Cooking
Culture
Education
Education #2
Entertainment
Etiquette
Family
Finances
Food and Drink
Food and Drink B
Gadgets and Gizmos
Gardening
Health
Hobbies
Home Improvement
Home Management
Humor
Internet
Jobs
Kids and Teens
Learning Languages
Leadership
Legal
Legal B
Marketing
Marketing B
Medical Business
Medicines and Remedies
Music and Movies
Online Business
Opinions
Parenting
Parenting B
Pets
Pets and Animals
Poetry
Politics
Politics and Government
Real Estate
Recreation
Recreation and Sports
Science
Self Help
Self Improvement
Short Stories
Site Promotion
Society
Sports
Travel and Leisure
Travel Part B
Web Development
Wellness, Fitness and Diet
World Affairs
Writing
Writing B